Sunday, June 22, 2014

Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes

Facts About Healthy Food Biography

Source(google.com.pk)
Make small steps, like adding a salad (full of different color vegetables) to your diet once a day or switching from butter to olive oil when cooking. As your small changes become habit, you can continue to add more healthy choices to your diet.
Every change you make to improve your diet matters. You don’t have to be perfect and you don’t have to completely eliminate foods you enjoy to have a healthy diet. The long term goal is to feel good, have more energy, and reduce the risk of cancer and disease. Don’t let your missteps derail you—every healthy food choice you make counts.
Think of water and exercise as food groups in your diet.
Water. Water helps flush our systems of waste products and toxins, yet many people go through life dehydrated—causing tiredness, low energy, and headaches. It’s common to mistake thirst for hunger, so staying well hydrated will also help you make healthier food choices.
Exercise. Find something active that you like to do and add it to your day, just like you would add healthy greens, blueberries, or salmon. The benefits of lifelong exercise are abundant and regular exercise may even motivate you to make healthy food choices a habit.
Healthy eating tip 2: Moderation is key
Harvard Healthy Eating Plate
People often think of healthy eating as an all or nothing proposition, but a key foundation for any healthy diet is moderation. But what is moderation? How much is a moderate amount? That really depends on you and your overall eating habits. The goal of healthy eating is to develop a diet that you can maintain for life, not just a few weeks or months, or until you've hit your ideal weight. So try to think of moderation in terms of balance. Despite what certain fad diets would have you believe, we all need a balance of carbohydrates, protein, fat, fiber, vitamins, and minerals to sustain a healthy body.

For most of us, moderation or balance means eating less than we do now. More specifically, it means eating far less of the unhealthy stuff (refined sugar, saturated fat, for example) and more of the healthy (such as fresh fruit and vegetables). But it doesn't mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza. If you eat 100 calories of chocolate one afternoon, balance it out by deducting 100 calories from your evening meal. If you're still hungry, fill up with an extra serving of fresh vegetables.

Try not to think of certain foods as “off-limits.” When you ban certain foods or food groups, it is natural to want those foods more, and then feel like a failure if you give in to temptation. If you are drawn towards sweet, salty, or unhealthy foods, start by reducing portion sizes and not eating them as often. Later you may find yourself craving them less or thinking of them as only occasional indulgences.
Think smaller portions. Serving sizes have ballooned recently, particularly in restaurants. When dining out, choose a starter instead of an entree, split a dish with a friend, and don't order supersized anything. At home, use smaller plates, think about serving sizes in realistic terms, and start small. If you don't feel satisfied at the end of a meal, try adding more leafy green vegetables or rounding off the meal with fresh fruit. Visual cues can help with portion sizes–your serving of meat, fish, or chicken should be the size of a deck of cards, a slice of bread should be the size of a CD case, and half a cup of mashed potato, rice, or pasta is about the size of a traditional light bulb.
Healthy eating tip 3: It's not just what you eat, it's how you eat
Healthy Eating
Healthy eating is about more than the food on your plate—it is also about how you think about food. Healthy eating habits can be learned and it is important to slow down and think about food as nourishment rather than just something to gulp down in between meetings or on the way to pick up the kids.

Dr. Catherine Shanahan's view:

The Food Pyramid was designed by lobbyists with industrial relationships rather than by scientists intending to help anyone engineer a healthy body. The notion that starches should form the base of your daily food intake and that a person on a 2000 calorie diet should get at least 250 grams of carbohydrates every day makes no physiologic sense because carbohydrates are absorbed into the blood as sugar. So as far as your body is concerned, a plate of whole grain pasta is like a pile of sugar laced with traces of fiber.
We've grown up equating sugar to energy, but research into a metabolic state called "nutritional ketosis" is uncovering incredible advantages to burning fat.

Even if you get those 250 grams of carbohydrate from supposedly healthy whole grains, few people are so active that they can afford 1000 calories of mostly empty energy. Don't forget the FDA recommends those 250 grams from whole grains in addition to several servings of fruit. Fruit, too, is mostly sugar. An average banana has about 30 grams of carbohydrate and only 1 gram of protein.

Topping off the food pyramid is more sugar! In the form of added sweeteners, which should make up 10 percent of your caloric intake according to the government. This would not be there at all without industrial lobbyists and the fact that such a ridiculous suggestion made it to print gives you some idea the degree to which the foxes have taken over our FDA henhouse.

As far as the recommendation of 2000 calories per day, this is way more than I can eat and I exercise regularly. Most women over 40 need significantly less than 2000 calories.

However, no matter one’s attachment to grains, the current science weighs seriously against grain consumption. Without going into too much detail (I strongly recommend Dr. Loren Cordain’s book: The Paleo Diet for more information), grains were not part of our evolutionary history. In fact, cereal grains were only introduced 10,000 years ago, which seems like a long time for most, but on a historical scale represents less than…a day! The implication of this "recent" introduction of grains is important, as most humans did not evolve to digest and process grains. This still holds true today, and according to certain references, and Dr. Aristo Vojdani in particular, close to half of the world’s population have the genetic inability to break down a very important protein contained in most cereal grains: gluten. Again, without going into too much detail (books have been written on the topic), gluten is substance that if not normally broken down into micromolecules, will irritate our intestinal lining and eventually favor breaking down of the intestinal barriers, promoting a condition called "leaky gut," that in turn can result in chronic infections, pro-inflammatory states, and auto-immunity. Furthermore, grains contain all kinds of other substances also called "anti-nutrients" such as lectins and phytic acid that contribute to their poor digestibility and therefore pathogenesis.

My body has recently been telling me that something is not right.  It started with some stomach pain…and then ended up with me having to camp in the smallest room and then turned into a sickness bug.  It kept me awake and if I did try to eat or drink something my body would very definitely tell me “no”.  It is probably a virus I have a raised temperature and generally feel poorly.

My initial reaction was to go to bed on Sunday afternoon to see if that saw off the initial stomach pains.  It didn’t.  I wondered if it was because I needed to eat something (remembering that I hadn’t eaten very much the day before) and so tried that, but my body quickly decided to expel any food and so I decided to see if sipping apple juice would help.  That was equally unsuccessful.  What was successful was my body’s attempts to let me know that something wasn’t working properly.  It had made that perfectly clear to me.  It was telling me what it did and didn’t want.

Our bodies are great for that.  It is always amazing when pregnant women get cravings for something they would never dream of eating pre-or-post-pregnancy.  Or when you get that feeling that you just “know” that your body is in need of fresh vegetables or a piece of fish or meat.

I am sure that in a few days time my body will start “behaving normally” again.  It will let me know when it is ready to resume normal service.  I will get my appetite back; food and fluid will be retained and my sleep will return to its usual routine.  But for now my body is making me do what it needs me to do.  It has made me refocus on just how brilliant my body is and made me review all those occasions when I “override” it.  When I push past something that I really should pay attention to, and my brilliant body does it’s very best to do what I am asking of it, even though it is letting me know that “all is not well”.

When I once again firing on all cylinders I am going to try to remember what the past few days have felt like.  I will try to remember that my body has the right to say “no”, and that I should listen to it.

So whatever you are doing… take a little time to really concentrate on what your body is telling you… if you do, it will be even more brilliant.

  Pour warm water over the top and let proof for 10 minutes.
Add oil, salt, and two cups of whole wheat flour. Mix in a large stand mixer with your dough hook, or with a regular mixer with as much of the flour as the mixer can handle.
If using a stand mixer, add the rest of the whole wheat flour and then the white flour and knead in the bowl for about 5 minutes.  If not, mix in as much flour as your mixer can handle, then take it out of the bowl and knead by hand for 10 minutes.
Place dough in a lightly-greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for about one hour.
Punch dough down and divide into eight pieces.
Roll each half into loaf-shapes. 
Place loaves onto two large baking sheets lined with parchment paper or a well greased mini loaf pan.
Cover the eight loaves and allow to rise for about an hour.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
Cook for 25 minutes, or until the top of the loaves are golden brown.
Vegetable options

Green peppers, chopped
Shredded carrots
Avocado
Jalapenos
Spinach
Roasted Red peppers
Pickles
Banana Peppers
Lettuce, shredded
Tomatoes, chopped
Cucumbers, thinly sliced
and Olives, chopped (sliced would work too)

After baking, we took out our veggies for the sandwiches.  We used (from top to bottom):

Green peppers, chopped
Shredded carrots
Avocado
Jalapenos
Spinach
Roasted Red peppers
Pickles
Banana Peppers
Lettuce, shredded
Tomatoes, chopped
Cucumbers, thinly sliced
and Olives, chopped (sliced would work too)

To make our sandwich bar just like Subway's, we had two things in mind. One, to make our hoagie rolls. And second, to find as many veggie toppings as we could come up with.  

Our bread, we adapted this recipe from Copycat Recipe Guide (and replaced the regular flour with whole wheat flour and the soybean oil with Grape Seed Oil)- Our full recipe is below.

We then baked our bread in a mini loaf pan- because we like small things!  You don't need a loaf pan. You can also divide your bread into 8 logs and bake it on a cookie sheet.

Nutrition panels can be confusing, but if you know how to read them they’re a useful source of information to help you make comparisons before you buy. It is important to look at the food as a whole rather than making purchasing decisions based on just one nutrient alone.

There are four main nutrients to look out for when shopping for foods:

Kilojoules
Sodium (salt)
Fibre
Saturated and Trans Fat
The main benefit of the nutrition panels is to compare the nutrient content of different varieties of similar foods. The quantity per 100 gram column is best when comparing similar products across different brands. The 'per serving' value allows you to understand nutrients in the amount in a serve. 

Nutrients that are always listed in the panel are: energy (kilojoules), protein, fat (total), saturated fat, carbohydrate (total), sugars and sodium. Additional nutrients such as vitamins and minerals are also listed, usually to support any nutritional claims the product is making.

Let’s take a closer look at this nutrition information panel for cereal bars.

Look for ‘Sugars’ on the Nutrition Information Panel of your product label. ‘Sugars’ is a total of added sugars and naturally occurring sugars.
The Heart Foundation recommends that Australians limit their intake of foods containing high amounts of added sugars. There are many names for added sugars, so look in the ingredients list for: sucrose, glucose, high fructose corn syrup, maltose, dextrose, raw sugar, cane sugar, malt extract and molasses.
Sugars occur naturally in fruit (fructose) and dairy foods (lactose). So while low fat milk may have higher levels of naturally occurring sugar (lactose), you’re also getting the goodness of calcium, protein and other nutrients. Other low fat dairy products and fresh or dried fruit can be higher in naturally occurring sugar and still be nutritious when eaten as part of a balanced diet.
When a product label says ‘No Added Sugar’ the product may contain naturally occurring sugars e.g. lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar), but no additional sugars have been added to the product.

Made up of mostly added sugar or saturated fat, a chocolate bar or soft drink is rightly considered to be a poor food choice because it’s also low in nutrients so all it gives your body is kilojoules with few nutrients.
Foods with the Tick must meet strict levels of kilojoules. As sugar provides kilojoules, this limits the amount of sugar that a Tick product may contain.

In Australia, the latest government recommendations do not specify a daily limit for carbohydrate, sugar or added sugar intake.  However for the prevention of heart disease and other chronic disease, it is suggested that all carbohydrate intake be between 45%-65% of your daily energy intake. 

What are carbohydrates?
Many people think of rice, potatoes and pasta as 'carbs' but that's only a small part of the huge range of foods know as carbohydrates. All fruit and vegetables, all breads and all cereal products are carbohydrates as well as sugars and sugary foods.

The goal of healthy eating is to develop a diet that you can maintain for life, not just a few weeks or months, or until you've hit your ideal weight. For most of us, that means eating less than we do now. More specifically, it means eating far less of the unhealthy stuff (refined sugar, saturated fat, for example) and replacing it with the healthy (such as fresh fruit and vegetables). But it doesn't mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza. If you eat 100 calories of chocolate one afternoon, balance it out by deducting 100 calories from your evening meal. If you're still hungry, fill up with an extra serving of fresh vegetables.

Try not to think of certain foods as “off-limits.” When you ban certain foods or food groups, it is natural to want those foods more, and then feel like a failure if you give in to temptation. If you are drawn towards sweet, salty, or unhealthy foods, start by reducing portion sizes and not eating them as often. If the rest of your diet is healthy, eating a burger and fries once a week probably won’t have too much of a detrimental effect on your health. Eating junk food just once a month will have even less of an impact. As you reduce your intake of unhealthy foods, you may find yourself craving them less or thinking of them as only occasional indulgences.
Think smaller portions. Serving sizes have ballooned recently, particularly in restaurants. When dining out, choose a starter instead of an entree, split a dish with a friend, and don't order supersized anything. At home, use smaller plates, think about serving sizes in realistic terms, and start small. If you don't feel satisfied at the end of a meal, try adding more leafy green vegetables or rounding off the meal with fresh fruit. Visual cues can help with portion sizes–your serving of meat, fish, or chicken should be the size of a deck of cards and half a cup of mashed potato, rice, or pasta is about the size of a traditional light bulb.
Healthy eating tip 3: It's not just what you eat, it's how you eat
Healthy Eating
Healthy eating is about more than the food on your plate—it is also about how you think about food. Healthy eating habits can be learned and it is important to slow down and think about food as nourishment rather than just something to gulp down in between meetings or on the way to pick up the kids.


Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes 
Facts About Healthy Food Healthy Food Pyramid Recipes Clipart List for Kids Plate Pictures Images Tumblr Quotes